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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 5,231 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> john: pink slime? for this energy drink and raw milk are illegal in my town. why do you want to drink raw mick mil can. >> because i want to. >> if you can't pick your own food are you free. >> it should be the freedom to own a gun. >> so can i eat him or her or him? >> was it good. >> that is our show tonight. [applause] >> and now john stossel. >> john: food can kill. people eat the wrong stuff and get sick. that is why most everyone that we need government to set limits. not bacteria chemicals. to make sure food companies tell you what is in their food and how fattening it is. state legislator felix ortiz has done that in new york city. he got trans fat man, calorie counts posted at mcdonald's and other fast-food places. now he wants a ban on adding too much salt. so you think he saved lives? >> absolutely. john: okay. a farmer. he grows vegetables dollar raises cows, chickens, and pigs. i assume you want the people who buy your beef and pork to be safe. so don't we owe him a vote of thanks for saving this? >> no. i would say you're killing me out here. trying to get my stuff to ma
john: are your instincts wrong? instinct tells us flying is dangerous, charity helps the poor, price gouging is evil and every adult should vote. tonight we challenge your instincts, who helps the poor more, charity or business? the charity or business? >> charity.harity. >> charity. john: is that true? self-interest.at true? more people than charity ever did.pe has. then, what scares you? are you scared of flying? bis is much more likely to killl you. and finally, it's your duty. i i say, say some of you shouldn't vote. because o some of you don't know much. >> do you know who this is? >> looks like will ferrell. john: do you both? maybe you shouldn't if you don't know who these people are. >speaker you are correct. john: your instinct is probably wrong. that's our show tonight. >> and now, john stossel. [applauding] john: what does your brain tl you that america should do about our problem? we have plenty. a lot of people are poor. we should spread the wealth around. i hear busesses raise prices and gouge people. foreigners sneak into america and take american jobs, there ou
a gun. was it could? to like this? that is our show tonight. [applause] >> and n john stossel. john: food can kill. people will eat the wrong stuff may get sick. it's while most everyone says we need government to set some limits. make sure there is not bacteria in your food or dangerous chemicals. to make sure food companies tell you what is in their food and how fattening it i. state legiator felix ortiz has done that in new york city. he got trans fat man, calorie counts posted at mcdonald's and other fast-food places. now he wants a ban on adding too much salt. so you think he saved lives? >> absolutely. john: okay. a farmer. he grows vegetables dollar raises cows, chickens, and pigs. i assume you want the people who buy your beef and pork to be safe so don't we owe him a vote of thanks for saving this? >> no. i would say you're killing me out here. trying to get my stuff to market. this plethora of government regulaons, you know, is killing our farm and our ability to come to market. john: you are just a greedy businessman and don't care people ed. let's go through some of the
. >> it is a virtuous cycle. almost as a global culture of giving among the top echelon. john: of "forbes" 400 list? >> exactly. we throw it against the wall to see if it sticks. john: you do something else? >> we give awards to social entrepreneurs. we focus on organizations working outside of government because we feel societe has more flexibility ban government contractors. charities used to be independent but now are contractors to the government. that is all you need the social impact bond to hold them accountable. john: i would rather use the money than government but government is captured. >> ben taxpayers want to know they get something for it to. recently these agencies have a good cause. that is different of kids not going back to jail. john: mark zuckerberg maybe feeling guilty gave $100 million to the new work public-school system. i see that it throws a down the drain giving it to the union's who ruined it in the first place. >> don't fund the problem. find the solution. that means if you see something terrible of the world, poverty you have to say our not just give money to anti-pove
? to like this? that is our show tonight. [applause] >> and now john stossel. john: food can kill. people will eat the wrong stuff may get sick. it's while most everyone says we need government to set some limits. make sure there is not bacteria in your food or dangerous chemicals. to make sure food companies tell you what is in their food and how fattening it is. state legislator felix ortiz has done that in new york city. he got trans fat man, calorie counts posted at mcdonald's and other fast-food places. now he wants a ban on adding too much salt. so you think he saved lives? >> absolutely. john: okay. a farmer. he grows vegetables dollar raises cows, chickens, and pigs. i assume you want the people who buy your beef and pork to be safe. so don't we owe him a vote of thanks for saving this? >> no. i would say you're killing me out here. trying to get my stuff to market. this plethora of government regulations, you know, is killing our farm and our ability to come to market. john: you are just a greedy businessman and don't care if people died. let's go through some of the ways that as
>> school is fun? >> they teach us in a fun way. john: you look forward to going to school? >> yes. twenty-seven regular government schools get results because they are a government monopoly of almost always do a lousy job. up against the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i was excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the applicatn. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> yes. john: you tr
. it is everywhere. john: does it make you feel safe the government spent 40 years studying the assault assault -- soap. do we need government to protect workers? >> absolutely. next? -- question. [laughter] >> good intentions and gone wrong. that is the show. tonight. john: politicians claimed they make life better to pass laws. they have good intentions but we should not judge by intention. politicians good intentions go wrong. work regulation. companies are not greedy they don't care about their workers but seems reasonable government has to protect them. almost everybody agrees. >> they should be protected. >> definitely. so many things could have been. corporations could be corrupt. the government should step been. john: that makes sense. so much beyond the workers' control. safety rules. what does a factory owner care? that is why we need occupational safety and health administration. it sets safety rules. they will show how the workplace deaths dropped since the beginning. thank goodness for government. except look at this graph. workplace death was dropped even before osha dropping just
. >> historian harlow giles unger recounts the life of the six president, john quincy adams who died in 1840. quincy adams, second president had a long career, which aside from his presidency 10 years as secretary of state, senator, congressman administered six countries. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. i will start with a fairly simple question. was very moment when he said to yourself i need to write a biography of john quincy adams? >> yes, indeed there was. it took place a couple years ago when i ran out of ideas for any more books on the founding fathers. others have written on washington, jefferson, madison and i had written on patrick henry, james monroe, john hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's pulitzer prize-winning book, profiles in courage and daring chapter one was john quincy adams. so i thought his name begins begins with a comma on the season chapter one. but i was not the reason. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of coverage and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageou
of the second president john adams had a long political career which included, aside from his presidency, ten years of secretary of state, senator, congressmen and miniature. this is a little under an hour. i will start with a very simple question. was there a moment you said to yourself i need to write a biography of john quincy adams? >> yes, indeed, there was. a couple years ago when i ran out of any ideas on the founding fathers. others had written on washington, jefferson, madison, and i'd written on patrick henry, james monroe, james hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's cal woods prize-winning book profiles in courage and their in chapter 1 was john quincy adams. i thought his name begins with a xu chapter 1. that's not the reason he was in chapter 1. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of courage, and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageous senators and congressmen in american history. he was not just the sixth president of the united states. he was a congressman as well for 16 years and a center for four years. m
will conduct a national test of the emergency alert system. >> you cannot avoid it. it is everywhere. john: does it make you feel safe the government spent 40 years studying the assault assault -- soap. do we need government to protect workers? >> absolutely. next? -- question. [laughter] >> good intentions and gone wrong. that is the show. tonight. john: politicians claimed they make life better to pass laws. they have good intentions but we should not judge by intention. politicians good intentions go wrong. work regulation. companies are not greedy they don't care about their workers but seems reasonable government has to protect them. almost everybody agrees. >> they should be protected. >> definitely. so many things could have been. corporations could be corrupt. the government should step been. john: that makes sense. so much beyond the workers' control. safety rules. what does a factory owner care? that is why we need occupational safety and health administration. it sets safety rules. they will show how the workplace deaths dropped since the beginning. thank goodness for government
and darkened to what was supposed to be a joke. that is wrap on news watch. see you next week. >> john: does that make you feel safe? >> you can't avoid it by flipping the charges, it's everywhere. >> does it make you feel safe that the government has spent 40 years running this? are your savings safer because of these two congressmen. >> do we need government to protect workers? >> absolutely. next question. [ laughter ] >> but one result is this. government's good intentions went wrong. that so our show tonight. tonight. john: politicians claimed they make life better to pass laws. they have good intentions but we should not judge by intention. politicians good intentions go wrong. work regulation. companies are not greedy they don't care about their workers but seems reasonable government has to protect them. almost everybody agrees. >> they should be protected. >> definitely. so many things could have been. corporations could be corrupt. the government should step been. john: that makes sense. so much beyond the workers' control. safety rules. what does a factory owner care? that is why
. tonight. john: what you think you know, may not be so? we know what. we watch tv while good what we know not be so? our instincts are often wrong. when i was a consumer reporter i thought consumer regulation was the answer. rahm. it hurts america of more. i thought america was running out of fuel, overpopulation, made in america. wrong. >> majority leader harry reid is upset the usoc bought uniforms from china. >> they should be burned and start over again. john: people are desperate for jobs. isn't it outrageous we buy uniforms made overseas? no. in this stupid. let me bring in professional help. whnot to worry about sending work to other countries? >> a fundamental trade makes everybody off. it benefits both parties. john: they could have been made by american workers. >> but we are so much better at other things that making garments is not the comparative advantage. john: that is not a problem. those are factory jobs they're not so pleasant they're designed and marketed and sold and shipped in trucks made on machines built by americans. the chinese olympic team will fly to london on t
. god"? tonight. john: i am out of my element. i like to talk about what i know, research, understand. "science vs. god"? i am over my head. we bribing guests who think and fight about this lot. what created by? i thought there was a big bang the universe was a single tiny point* until there was an explosion of energy then life grew. smart people are convinced that is the way it went down. but did god cause the big bang? how did humans have been? is there the intelligent design? yes says dinesh d'souza up. michael shermer says no. how do know? >> hi cannot be certain there is no god but reasonably confident an apology, religion, psychology shows people invent guide to explain causality. wiser storms, accidents comment people die, hunter-gatherer's through the modern world, hammons construct a guide to explain things. different gods, religions, but what are the chances that 999 others are false and this is the one true god or they are all social be constructed? >> when rethink of god you can think of but tall mountain. we stand at the base. we see little to be terry's of the informatio
>> i have t agree with john. lou: stephen hayes get last word. >> i think it is possible we don't but i suspect we'll have some last minute, slap dash, terrible washington style deal that won't do anything. this fiscal cliff doesn't solve our long-term debt propses. lou: breaking with the practice and policies of washington over the course of the past 50 years. stephen hayes, thank you very much. judith miller, thank you very much. john fund, thank you. time for a few quick comments. ken wrote us to say, correct me if i'm wrong, wasn't it the obama administration that released thousands of guns into the hands of criminals? now they want to talk gun control for law-abiding citizens? that was just "fast and furious." mike tweeted us about benghazi and the report, always blame the dead guys. they did. thanks for being with us. has t. >> wall street is very concerned. no dou the average folks at home who have been cutting back more inclined to hang onto their wallets. they don't know what will happen. thank you congress. thank you mr. president. >> it is charities' season. makes us
tragedy. now, the superintendent of one of the districts issued a statement saying... john fuglesang my friends has it really come to this? that kindergarteners can't go to school because we, as a country can't ensure they'll be safe from semi-automatic weapon wielding lunatics and the solution from our far right wing friends? arm the teachers. the very teaches they've called union thugs. we should pay to train these teachers. the people who scream us to about fast and furious and said gun proliferation and mexico was dangerous are still telling us gun proliferation in america makes us safer. welcome to the u.s.a. where of some you will find it's easier to buy a weapon designed to kill a lot of people in a short amount of time than it is to marry who you love or vote where you want or send your kids to kindergarten. we now live in a society where the aurora, colorado, shooter could buy 6,000 rounds of ammo online and tommy chung went to jail for selling bombs. it is painfully obvious... we need change in this co
will conduct a national test of the emergency art system. >> you cannot avoid it. it is everywhere. john: does it make you feel safe the government spent 40 years studying the assault assault -- soap. do we need government to protect rkers? >> absolutely. next? -- question. [laughter] >> good intentions and gone wrong. that is the show. tonight. john: politicians claimed they make life better to pass laws. they have good intentions but we should not judge by intention. politicians good intentions go wrong. work regulation. companies are not greedy they don't care about their workers but seems reasonable government has to protect them. almost everybody agrees >> they should be protected. >> definitely. so many things could have been. corporations could be corrupt. the government should step been. john: that makes sen. so much bend the workers' control. safety rules. what does a factory owner care? that is why we need occupationalafety and health administration. it sets safety rules. they will show how the workplace deaths dropped since the beginning. thank goodness for government. except look a
goodman: explain what the voting rights act said. rep. john lewis: the voting rights act of 1965 said, in effect, that you cannot use a literary test, you cannot have a poll tax, you cannot use certain devices, you cannot harass, you cannot intimidate. and before you make any changes in election laws dealing with registration, changing a precinct, local lines for any political position, you have to get pre-clearance from the department of justice or the federal district court in washington, d.c. so, the state of florida, for an example, never sought to get clearance to purge. and they're hiding behind there may be fraud. that's their own. amy goodman: you were on that selma to montgomery march. this. can you explain what happened, as we go back, what, almost half a century now? rep. john lewis: on march 7, 1965, a group of us attempted to march from selma to montgomery, alabama, to dramatize to the nation that people wanted to register to vote. one young african-american man had been shot and killed a few days earlier, in an adjoining county called perry county-this is in the black be
, remembering two environmental champion, john muir and rachel carson. all straight ahead on a second look. good evening and a welcome, i am julie haner. tonight we remember two environmentalist, and rachel carson's book silent spring and john muir bfs book's book the yosemite and wat an watson brought us this history in 2000 of yosemite. >> molding and carving yosemite. the signature on this sculpture was written by a 60 long glacier that chisels its way leaving yosemite valley in its wake. half dome, and all this right here in this small valley is almost too much to take in. it is enormous and about the size of the state of rhode island. almost 4 million people visited last year and you might be tempted to ask are we loving yosemite to death? greedy ravages of man have been the big threat. >> what we have here in yosemite, we have the best of the best and the worst of the wours. we have the scenery and the water falls and 800 miles of hiking trails. but we have hoards and hoards of people coming. so i think john muir never advocated keeping people out. >> the limits of transportation kept peop
,000 less per child. john: how did they get them so interested? >> mask? >> reading, writing. john: that is not work the school day is longer they stay until 5:00 p.m. and the chartered teachers could be asked to work more but they told us that they don't mind. you will be burnt out. >> that is not an option because we have our eye on the prize. >> they do -- use new teaching techniques sometimes they wear your pieces and coach. >> what are they telling you? >> the news that i don't see if i don't think of a great question and the moment my principal can feed that to me. >> athletes in the olympics the constant support to be on the top of their game. >> they constantly wave their hands and it confused me but then the students explained it is called active listening instead of interrupting to say can i go to the bathroom or can i a greek they make hand gestures. >> hi eighth test scores make this so popular that the parents line up to get their kids in the line goes on and on forever and it goes around the block. >> so many applicants but not that many spaces. >> what do you do when
and tracey and john . jill joining us. wayne we'll start with you. is it time for a national lottery to pay down the federal debt same time. >> a question why not. if it works with the state governments. why not the federal government and make it a big and huge one and any lttle niche that you can knock down the deficit is good. >> okay, but john, what happens to the states. we are finding out that california is signing up for powerball because of the revenues that they get. ist bad for states. >> it is really bad for states. wayne has much chae of winning the lottery as geth through a comment without johnathon interrupting. >> zero. >> and the problem you have with this. this could be a billion dollar ck mots and huge and going to kill the state lottos and in the stouthern states. they were sold as a way of funding education . that didn't happen. they are dependent on the general fund. cash strapped states that depend on the lotto, you will cripple the funding for the states is it a bad idea. it robseter to pay paul. >> johnathon, you wouldn't be cutting wayne off. >> i am keeping quiet. w
nonviolent coordinating committee. now 13 term congressman john lewis. >> it is so important for people to understand, to know that people are suffering, struggling. some have died for the right to participate. the boat is the most powerful nonviolent tool that we have a democratic society. >> across that bridge, life lessons for change. with congress member john lewis. all that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. amy goodman: we spend today's hour looking at the bloody struggle to obtain-and protect- voting rights in this country. since 2010, at least 10 states have passed laws that require people to show a government- issued photo id when they go to the polls. while supporters say the laws protect against voter fraud, others argue they're more likely to suppress voter turnout among people of color, the poor and proper id and find it harder to obtain one. in total, 16 states have passed restrictive voting laws that could shape the 2012 election, including the vital swing states of florida and pennsylvania. well, on mo
john: you look forward to going to school? >> yes. twenty-seven regular government schools get results because they are a government monopoly of almost always do a lousy job. up against the education blob that his job of the hunt teachers' union comment janitor union, bureaucrats they're resist change that is why -- while i was excited charters schools. schools could experiment the parents would see how much better it could be and kids would benefit from the innovation. it is not happening. sometimes. but the center for education reform says the charter movement has gone wrong. what happened is an example. >> my group have put together an application to start a charter school and we have been repeatedly stonewalled 57 because of your own daughter's experience you've got together with people and said we will start a charter. >> the first application was 100 pages could. denied. >> they said there was not a need we had typographical errors in the application. john: wouldn't mcdonald's like to say that to burger king? >> yes. john: you try again. >> we fixed them and we got more p
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 5,231 (some duplicates have been removed)